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The Right Path

Egg

Camellias

Poppy

Happy Things

I’ve always been a worrier. I question everything, second guess decisions and fret about what the future holds, much more than I’d like to. Sometimes I wonder if we’re heading in the right direction and if we’re making progress, I question past choices and wonder how things might have been if we’d chosen something different. I worry, worry worry…

But then, I find myself painting the last coat of white on a rattly old window and I am reminded that this creaky house is ours. We own a house, and though it is old and shabby, it is full of love and music, the smell of pancakes and the sound of teaspoons tapping china as cups of tea are stirred.

I say good morning to the chickens and give them their breakfast, then I find two perfect, fresh eggs, and I am reminded that we are on the way to producing much of our own fresh produce. The glimpse of a green bud on the plum tree is a testament to the fact that one day soon our garden will be bursting with fruit and flowers.

I watch Reuben play with the dogs on the grass and I am reminded of how lucky I am to have found such a kind and happy soul to share my life with. Someone who is so perfectly similar to me and yet so totally, completely opposite to me, that we fit together like puzzle pieces. Somehow, miraculously, we found each other.

In these moments I know, with full certainly, that every choice we’ve made has been the right one (even the wrong ones) because they have led us here. We are exactly where we need to be right now. Our life isn’t perfect, but it is cemented in all of our dreams, all that we want for our family’s future, and all that we believe to be good and true. As times goes by my vision of a simple, mindful, beautiful life, grows clearer and my resolve to achieve it grows stronger.

Each day we take a few small steps forward. We are on the right path.

Katie xx

Comments { 14 }

The Chicken Tractor

We’ve had a few questions about our chicken tractor, so I thought I might as well put a post together answering them all in one spot…

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Tilly (now Billy), Madge (now Matt), Beatrice & Evie.

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Reuben with the new girls, Agnes (on the right) and Betty.

Our flock of four has undergone some changes in the last few weeks. Sadly, Madge and Tilly turned out to be Matt and Billy, and since we aren’t allowed to keep roosters in town, they had to be rehomed. They’ve since been replaced with two more sweet little Wyandotte bantams. Keeping up with the House of Eliott theme, our new girls are named Betty and Agnes. After some initial upset amongst the girls, they have now settled in with Beatrice and Evie really well.

We actually had a bit of a scare with Beatrice this week. She was very unwell and at one point I was quite sure we were going to lose her, but with some antibiotics, two nights spent in a cat carrier indoors (with a hot water bottle!) and lots of love, she recovered. She is back to her cute, friendly, happy self again now. Thank goodness! (She’s got such a sweet temperament, she’s a bit of a favourite around here.)

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Beatrice and Evie.

Chicken Tractor

Everyone in the tractor, watching me excitedly as I walk over with some fresh silver beet for them.

We first got the idea for our chicken tractor from an episode of Gardening Australia. Our girls have a small coop under our little apple tree where they sleep and lay. It’s big enough for them to wander and scratch about in, but they quickly denuded it of any greenery and we wanted to give them access to fresh grass, weeds, bugs and grubs, so they could scratch and forage. Unfortunately, as much as we’d like to, we can’t let our girls wander free range (because our fences are inadequate and our dogs would like to eat them!) so a chicken tractor was the perfect solution. The tractor allows us to give them access to fresh earth and grass to happily carry out their natural chicken behaviours, digging and fossicking, while staying safe.

On wet or windy days, and days when we aren’t home, the chooks stay in their coop, but when the weather is good and we are at home, we put them out in their tractor. We put them out in the tractor mid to late morning, so they have time to lay in their laying box before they go out, and bring them in just as it starts to cool off before dusk. We move the chicken tractor a few times throughout the day, so they always have access to fresh greenery, bugs and grubs to pick at.

The tractor itself is just a light weight run that we purchased from a discount store. Reubs originally planned to make one, but when we found the perfect thing for a great price, we snapped it up. We bought the run when we only had two chickens and though they are still very happy in their tractor, now that our tiny flock has grown, we are planning to upgrade to a bigger one.

And that’s it really! How we work our chicken tractor. If you keep (or would like to keep) chickens in a small backyard or a space that isn’t safe for free ranging, we highly recommend this system. The girls love having the chance to scratch for bugs and dig in the dirt, and we love hearing their happy, chooky noises from the garden!

Katie xx

Comments { 11 }

Suburban Jungle

Reuben and Veggie Beds

Gardening

Poppy

Garden

Daisy

Planting

We spent a lot of the weekend in the garden, building two more veggie beds, planting a couple of citrus trees, pruning and pottering. Though our garden isn’t producing much now, it feels good to be building something for the future. From little things big things grow.

I must admit, when Reubs and I moved into this house I was a bit worried about going overboard in the garden. Our block is very small and awkwardly shaped and I seriously doubted that we’d ever be able to make it particularly productive. Reubs was keen to make the most of our limited space and cram it full of edibles. He immediately wanted to rip out all the lawn and replace it with a giant veggie patch, and was adamant that we had enough space for a number of fruit trees, but I was reluctant. It seems crazy to me now but I didn’t like the idea of not having any lawn and I was scared that if we planted too much our yard would look messy and unattractive. (What would the neighbours think?!) So we started small with two little veggie beds, a couple of fruit trees and two chickens, and bit by bit we’ve added more and more. We now have four large veggie beds, ten fruit trees, two passionfruit vines, a couple of berry plants, two elderflower bushes (for making cordial) and hopps (for making beer) which we plan to plant next to the car port so it can climb. We are also hoping to turn a whole corner of our yard into a large chicken coop, so we can keep a bigger flock of chooks. Slowly, I’ve come to realise just how much can be done with a small space (we still have room for so much more!) and I now have a completely different kind of vision for our garden. Not a tidy lawn, tidy veggie beds, tidy trees and small tidy chicken coop, but a rambling patch overflowing with homegrown fruit, veggies, flowers and chickens.

I recently bought Backyard Self Sufficiency by Jackie French (which I highly recommend) and today I was having a read when I stumbled across a quote that so perfectly summed up what I’ve been thinking and feeling, that I had to share it with you. Jackie says:

“I have two images of suburban life today.

The first is of a neat house set in a mown lawn with trimmed shrubs and a sandpit; a clean kitchen with yesterday’s takeaway containers in the sink; and the latest DVDs to fill your life after dinner.

The second is of a suburban jungle: a maze of tangled apple trees and grapevines, carpets of strawberries, and kids with mulberry-stained faces who don’t come inside till dark. You trip over a box of apples in the laundry and the kitchen smells of summer tomatoes and of the basil on the windowsill.

The kitchen shelves are full, so are the lives of the inhabitants.

The richness of our lives depends on our surroundings and what we fill them with.”

I know which one I’d prefer. Bring on the jungle.

Katie xx

PS Just in case you are wondering what our “chicken tractor” is doing in our new veg beds – we were using the girls’ scratching skills to get a headstart on digging up the grass.
PPS My cute apron and trowel are from lovely Brenda‘s wonderful new shop.

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My Simple Life: Julie Letowski

Our next guest in the My Simple Life series is lovely Julie, who blogs over at Cinnamon Girl. I first stumbled across Julie’s beautiful little corner of the internet last year, just as she and her family were about to move onto their very own farm, and I have loved following their journey into homesteading and living their dream ever since. I was so thrilled when Julie agreed to share a little of her story here on House of Humble!

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Tell us a little about yourself.

Hello! I’m Julie. I live in the mid coast region of Maine and, alongside my husband and son, I’m in the midst of bringing an old farm back to life. I teach piano, sometimes act as a doula, and am trying with all my might to carve out a living that doesn’t include off farm work. You can find me (very sporadically during these summer days) writing at Cinnamon Girl and @homesweethomestead on Instagram.

Last year you moved to your very own homestead in Maine. Can you tell us a bit about your journey to buying a farm? What were you doing before you moved to the homestead? Did you have any farming experience?

Before we moved to Maine and our farm, we did a lot of moving. We lived in Boston, Martha’s Vineyard, Nashville, Boston again, and then finally Maine. I was either in college, pregnant, being a mama, or training to become a doula for most of that time. My farming experience was limited to a lot of horribly neglected home gardens, and many documentaries and books!

The explanation for how we came to be people that wanted to buy a farm is really short and sweet. We started shopping at farmers’ markets and the deal was almost instantly sealed. Not only did we personally want access to healthier, safer, and more varied food, we also wanted to give that same opportunity to people in our community. As for the actual journey from point A of wanting a farm to point B of having a farm, well that’s a little longer.

In the beginning it was really fun to look for a farm. There was a lot of daydreaming and just general surface-y thinking about the whole thing- oh I can just imagine my pies cooling in that window! But as the reality of what was really available at the time hit, the fun began to temper itself and we were left feeling desperate, frustrated, and hopeless at times. If I’m being completely honest, buying a farm was a long and difficult process. There were so many places that we found that were totally right… except for one really big thing we couldn’t get past. For instance, my dream farmhouse had gaping holes in the ceiling and a “view” in the bathroom wall clean through to outside, among other things, and in the end we had to walk away. It seemed the places we could afford were so run down that we couldn’t afford all the repairs necessary after handing over our down payment or if the place was in decent shape, the asking price really reflected that.

Ultimately we made a lot of big leaps. When the sale of a farm in Maine fell through two weeks before we had to be out of our apartment in Boston, we just decided to move to Maine anyway and figure it out from there. We rented a house sight unseen and jumped! Over the next four months we looked and we looked. We widened our net, we changed our list of must haves… And eventually I found our dream farm, the farm we’re happily calling our own today! But we had to leap again- it was much further north than we had planned and until my husband could find a different job, he would have to commute an hour and a half to work every single day. It was a hard transition and a rocky first year but I can say without reservation that we are where we’re supposed to be.

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What did it feel like that first morning you woke up on your own land?

It was good to wake up in our place that first day after working so hard to get there but there was also a little fear. There was so much unknown! And the place still very much felt like it belonged to the previous owners, despite having signed the papers and handed over the money! Honestly, the feeling that you would expect to have that first morning is way more a part of my life in our second year here than it was in that first year. Now that I’ve really started to settle in and this place feels like my own, I’m regularly blown away by it all. We did it! We made it! And to here of all places! We are incredibly lucky to have found a solidly built old and quirky house on just enough beautiful land to let us try our hands at a little bit of anything we want. It’s so unbelievable and rocks me daily.

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What do you grow/raise/produce on your farm?

Currently we’re in two farmers’ markets selling our baked goods made with organic and locally sourced ingredients, our herbal teas made from foraged or homegrown herbs and flowers, and we also brew locally roasted coffee on a homemade pour over coffee bar. Recently I’ve started making granola and muesli with Maine grown oats and Maine maple syrup and it’s been a really great experience. We’re hoping to get into a few of the food co-ops!

Right now we’re still in the figuring out exactly what we want to do phase so we’ve tried a lot, been successful at some, and crossed plenty of things off our list of interests. Since this past summer we’ve been raising two heifers who we hope will become milk cows next spring. This past January we home processed the two pigs we had been raising the previous summer and fall. We raised enough Thanksgiving turkey to feed ourselves and friends, and three other families. We also began raising meat rabbits on pasture this past fall with the intention of filling a void of pastured rabbit meat for restaurants in Maine. And of course we have chickens and ducks! If money and time were no object, I would have a huge flock of sheep right now and a natural dye garden that was bursting! Longterm I see myself getting in dyeing and spinning yarn. Five year plan!

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Tell us about a typical day on the homestead.

It really depends on the day! There are the standard jobs of feeding and watering and ensuring good health and well-being of all of the animals every day and that’s about all that is consistent. That and our 4-5 am wake up call from a very persistent, wildly energetic almost 4 year old! I take the chickens and the ducks and the child. My husband takes the cows and rabbits. Then we address whatever is most in need of our attention in the the few hours before my husband heads off to his full time off farm job. Tuesdays and Fridays are my baking days, Wednesdays and Saturdays are my market days, Mondays and Thursdays are days to really focus in on my son as he gets Not Now-ed and Later-ed way too much on baking and market days, and Sundays we’re all together from sun up to sun down racing the clock to move things forward on the homestead. This year we are incredibly focused on securing a food supply for winter. It isn’t cheap to stay warm in Maine in the winter and I’m doing everything I can to cut our wintertime food bill.

4-5 a.m.: Begrudgingly leave bed.
5-6 a.m.: Feed the masses!
6-8:30 a.m.: Weed, plant, haul, clean!
9 a.m.: Husband off to work, The child and I continue our work- but at a much slower pace.
10-2 p.m.: Avoid that sun! Indoors baking, brewing herbal teas, planning, feeding, canning, working on the business end of market and farm.
2-4 p.m.: Sleeping child, working double time mama. This is when I do all the things that are too delicate for a little helper- like transplanting fragile plants – or I do the things that just won’t hold my son’s attention long enough- like weeding.
4-7:30 p.m.: More outside work, trips the library, shop for the market, make some dinner- hopefully with help from the garden!, and put the child to bed.
7:30 p.m.-dark (sometimes later with a head lamp): My husband is home again and we’re doing whatever we can in the last few hours of the day, hoping we’ll feel less behind in the morning when we wake up!

And of course this is when things are ideal and say there isn’t a cow running down the road or a pen of young rabbits loose in the field or a completely uncooperative 4 year old. You would think from the schedule above that my garden is immaculately weeded- it is not. Oh, well! Also, despite having a to-do list that is never completed I find it incredibly important that I take time to do things like read or knit. If I’m constantly doing just the things that must get done life begins to feel too heavy. So, you can find me during nap time at least a few times a week sitting down doing something quietly, doing something that I don’t have to be doing but instead that I just want to do.

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How has life change for your family since you moved to your farm?

Our biggest change was also our biggest goal- we’re far more self-reliant now than we have ever been before. Of course there is still progress to to be made but we are getting there. It feels so good! There’s also the huge change of going from urban to rural- we have far less just at our fingertips nowadays. I can’t just decide to take a class in anything I want, there aren’t big box stores that offer anything I might need, and in some ways it’s harder to create a community. But, in regards to the last one, we’re getting there. It’s just going to take time. The changes that we’ve experienced I must say – even when they have felt negative – are ultimately positive. More than anything the move we’ve made has caused us to really get a clear look at what we actually need in life to survive and to be happy.

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What do you love about your lifestyle? What do you find challenging?

I both love and am challenged by the solitude we experience, particularly in winter and in regards to my son. I think it’s all fine and well for me to become a hermit but I do have my reservations about what that experience will do to my son. I love our quirky house and our land- we’ve got a small spot of 10 acres but it’s beautiful and really feels like the find of a lifetime. I love the companionship of our animals. My heart belongs to one of our cows- Luella. She is my heart outside of my body in the animal world! Knowing she’ll be a mama cow next year (if all goes to plan) just totally rocks my world. I love the responsibility we take for ourselves here- I feel the weight of my own needs every day by trying to provide for them and it keeps me honest, keeps me good. The hardest part of it all though- and Katie can attest to this and my lack of timely response with this interview- is that my time is not my own in the way that it used to be. In our past life I could schedule myself in a way that most things got done. I could get caught up. I could be there for friends and family- physically and emotionally. But now, my birthday presents and thank you notes arrive late, if at all. I’m unable to attend weddings or meet new babies for people that are big parts of my heart, and the worst part is that oftentimes people aren’t able to understand. Most of our family and friends still live in that old world of ours where things can be managed and scheduled. They’ve never had to find someone competent enough and willing to care for 50+ animals there are integral to their livelihood or their survival. It’s just hard to bridge the gap sometimes.

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What advice would you give someone considering a similar path?

Do it! Jump! Take all the chances! This life is good. Hard but so good. And start today, even if you’re in the city or the suburbs still. This life is so full of mistakes and learning the hard way and you might as well get as much of that out of the way now as you can. Grow in your windowsills, put chickens in your suburban backyard, volunteer at farms, sign up for a community garden plot, read, watch documentaries, become a farm intern, shop local, eat local, befriend the people that grow your food- just immerse yourself in the community. Also- and I think most importantly- go easy on yourself. Farming, homesteading, or even gardening is a process. You don’t wake up one day and have it all under control. We spent our first summer overextending ourselves and feeling horrible for our failures- so much so that we didn’t enjoy our life and our land and the opportunities we had nearly as much as we should have. So, learn, forgive yourself, and enjoy your life at every single stage of the journey!

Katie xx

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My Simple Life: Sash Milne

This is the first post in a brand new series for House of Humble, called My Simple Life. A “simple life” means something different to each of us, so our aim for this series is to feature beautiful people from all walks of life, just to chat about their their unique story and what simple living looks like for them. Our hope is that in looking at a diverse range of lifestyles and perspectives, we all might learn something, discover a different way of looking at things, or find something new to be inspired by.

Our first guest is gorgeous Sash Milne from Inked in Colour. At the beginning of the year Sash undertook a commitment to buy nothing new in 2104. No new clothes, homewares, cosmetics, toys… Absolutely nothing new! I have found Sash’s journey during the Nothing New project fascinating, and extremely inspiring. Reading her posts has made me take pause and really reconsider the way I consume and think about material things. I think you guys will find her story pretty incredible too!

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Tell us a bit about yourself.

A few years ago I found myself in a pretty dark place, I was a good person who had done some pretty average things. I was a new mother. A wayward traveller. A wanderer. I had been living the simple life on the dark sand beaches of another world in a shack with no electricity or running water. I lived there for three years. Whilst it started as the most amazing adventure it ended in a series of tragedies that left me questioning who I was. I was a hopeless romantic in a loveless marriage in a foreign village at the end of the universe with a tiny baby in a sling on my chest.

I got kicked in the teeth by life and I brought my daughter home to Australia and spent a whole year just taking care of us, healing a broken heart… But we’ve come out the other side of it, as a family of two, stronger and more committed to building the life that is perfect for us, not the life that is perfect for the pages of a magazine.

Sometimes I write about things that are hard to write. Because things that are hard to write are truths that are infinitely more important than throw rugs. Sometimes I write about everyday people that are really inspiring. Because inspiring people are infinitely more incredible than cute homewares. Sometimes I write about food that you can cook in your own kitchen, without fancy gadgets or expensive ingredients. Because good food is the foundation of a good community, it’s our history, it’s our road back home.

I’m a terribly flawed human being, I’m a walking contradiction. And, just like you, I’m just trying to do the best with what I’ve got. Trying to find my place in the world… Inked in Colour is the place where I share parts of that journey, with anyone who feels like joining us for the ride.

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Tell us about the Nothing New project.

I have never been a great collector of things. Experiences, yes, but not things. Yet still, when I look around my home at our full closets and our comfortable rooms I know that we have more than enough. So for one year I’m going to see if I can make it stretch, by not buying anything new.

For a whole year.

A year of no shopping malls or outlets. A year of no online shopping or list writing. A year of no unnecessary product consumption. I will buy nothing new, for 52 weeks. It’s daunting and exciting and liberating all at once. I wrote a lot at the end of last year about consumption and wish lists and my frustration with our consumerist society. It’s time to practice 100% of what I preach.

Things don’t matter. People do. It’s simplicity at its most honest.

I’m going to start borrowing things, and lending things out. I’m going to not base any of my (self) worth on what I have or what I wear. I’m going to step right out of my comfort zone and change my habits. Because a year with purposeful change is a year with great purpose.

One year with no unnecessary purchasing footprint. No clothes or toys or home wares. No cosmetics. No trinkets or shoes. No upgrades. Nothing that we don’t genuinely need. Resourcefulness is a wonderful skill to incubate. Anything we truly need is to be sourced second hand or borrowed. We are returning to the days of my grandmothers, where clothes are fixed and everything that is no longer needed is either turned into something new or given away to someone else who can use it.

A year of no waste. It’s a year of considering what we bring into our house and reconsidering the way we dispose of our garbage. It’s a yearlong exercise in discipline and mindfulness.

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Where did the idea for the project come from and what are you hoping to achieve with it?

The idea for the project came from the crazy push of the pre-Christmas rush. I was in a department store with a toddler on my hip and I was watching parents loading trolleys full of cheap crappy toys and pushing past each other to get to stocking stuffers. I started to look at the way we consume a bit differently… I started to wonder why we were valuing the procurement of stuff so much more than we were valuing people.

So with one little decision the Nothing New project was born. With it came a commitment to stop buying stuff I don’t need. A commitment to focus on connecting with real people and building community. A commitment not just to an idea but to an action, and with it, a commitment to take conformity and to just throw it out the window.

For me, I’m hoping to change the way I approach the world. It’s so easy to get sucked in, to feel a bit crap about yourself because you can’t afford the clothes or homewares that everyone else seems to have.

The only way I have a chance to teach my daughter that things don’t make you happy, is to prove it to myself first.

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How is it going? What have you found easy? What have you found challenging?

You know, we are almost halfway through the year now, and time is just flying by. The first month was a really important time to relearn how to exist without just coasting through the shops for something to do. I didn’t step foot in a shopping mall for more than three months, and there was something really liberating about not allowing myself to feel like I need to be anything more than I am. To step out of the rat race, and to focus my energy on building community around us, it’s the best feeling. For my daughter’s birthday I invested time in building a dollhouse out of completely recycled materials that I found at the rubbish tip. It was a great project and I’m looking forward to doing more projects like this later in the year. It’s amazing how many perfectly good things we all throw away, to find a way to repurpose them is practical, ethical and really rewarding.

That being said, the project has started getting more difficult in ways. Most of the time it’s really easy but there are days when I do wonder if it’s making any difference at all. I’ve had problems with some of my photography equipment, leaving me without a camera for a lot of this year – which as a freelance writer and photographer has been very challenging. I’m still working out what to do about it and trying to justify any decision I may make. Also; my favourite clothes are full of holes. It might not seem like much but on days when I find it hard… it upsets me I can’t just go and replace a few key items that would make me feel a bit better about getting dressed on days when I’m struggling. But again it’s just remembering why I’m doing this…

We are about to enter the next phase of the project where we are actually going to live transitionally and see if alternate living is truly possible (for us). We will no longer have our own home, instead we will explore a few different lifestyles that force us to engage differently with the world around us; including woofing (working on an organic farm) and house sitting. The aim is to see how we can make positive impacts on our community and transform the rhythm of our lives. It might be a total disaster with a toddler, but the only way I’m going to find out is to just jump in. So jump we will.

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How has the Nothing New project changed the way you think about material things? Do you think the project will change the way you consume forever?

The Nothing New Project has changed the way I think about material things. By not making any meaningless purchases, I am more creative with and aware of the things I have. Some people use the word sacrifice, but I don’t feel like I’m giving up things I love or being a martyr to a cause. It’s liberating never stepping foot inside department stores, it’s freeing to not worry about whether or not I have that ‘thing’ that everyone else has. Sure, some days I wish I could go out and buy something that I want but then I remind myself how much I have, and how lucky I am and I find a bit of perspective and I embrace my ugly shoes and my tired jeans and I get on with my day – because there are so many things that are so much more important (to me).

As for the idea of spending lots of money and buying new things? It certainly doesn’t thrill me, but it doesn’t disgust me either – money serves a purpose and that purpose is different for each of us, I get that. It gives us lots of freedom to do awesome things and go on great adventures but it is not the answer to happiness and the crazy habit that we have of using it to desperately try to keep up with the Joneses is crazy.

The Joneses are broke.

The Jonses are stressed. The Joneses are living on credit. I certainly don’t want to be the Joneses.

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Has the Nothing New project changed your life in other ways?

It has been transformative. I have become more confident. More clear. More kind. I have an amazing group of beautiful special people who have come into my life in the past six months and have changed me, welcomed me, loved me… and made me a better person for it.

Would I have found these people without this project? Maybe. But maybe not.

I’m about to finish my masters and I’m really looking forward to working harder on making a positive impact in my community more in the last six months of this project… I still have a lot of work to do on myself, and I’ve found the best way to do that is to get out there in the community, to give back and to be connected. People really are the answer to everything.

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What advice would you give someone considering undertaking something similar?

The best advice I could give anyone would be to just dive in. There is never a right time to give up consumption, there is always birthdays and commitments and stuff that we want. The funny thing is machine will keep on turning, even without you in it, and when you step out of it, you are unlikely to miss it much at all. The truth is that you can give up consumption and still grow and thrive and experience a really rewarding life, it’s just about gaining a bit of perspective and changing some old habits. Doing things with other people is a much greater gift than buying them things.

Why not just start now? You don’t need anything fancy to begin, you don’t need to prepare. You can just start where you are, with what you have, right now.

I remember when I first decided I was going to do this project, one of my best friends said to me, ‘you have two weeks left! Why aren’t you out there buying everything you might possibly want/need for the next twelve months?’ I laughed, but I didn’t go back to the shops. I had made the decision I was going to do it and haven’t bought anything since.

It’s not about having everything you might “need” the truth is we need very little. I feel like we are often blinded by wish lists and wants and advertising that we forget what is so important and so fulfilling about living a simple, connected life. Other people matter so much more than things ever could. Not just your best friends and your family, but your community, your neighbours, people you’ve never met before. People matter most.

In the second half of this year I’m going to run a few online workshops to guide people through a month of buying nothing new. It will be a great place to start. For anyone who would like to be involved, keep an eye out on the blog or send me an email to sash@inkedincolour.com.

Katie x

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